EDITING : 2022.7.18 월 18:01
The Gachon Herald
Korea’s Obsession with the MBTIIts Popularity and the Problems
kweagle  |  g.herald1984@gmail.com
폰트키우기 폰트줄이기 프린트하기 메일보내기 신고하기
Updated : 2022.06.30  12:27:05
트위터 페이스북 미투데이 요즘 네이버 구글 msn
 MBTI stands for Myers-Brigg Type Indicator and was developed by Isabel Myers and her mother Katherine Briggs based on their work with Carl Jung's theory of personality types. It presents a total of 16 personalities according to four indicators: extroversion and introversion (depending on how a person directs and receives energy), sensing and intuition (related to how a person takes in information), thinking and feeling (based on how a person comes to conclusions), judging and perceiving (indicating how a person relates to the outside world). It is relatively easy to use and is one of the most popular psychological instruments currently in use internationally. 
 
 The MBTI personality test is one of the most popular tests in Korea right now, according to Paik Jong-woo, a professor of psychiatry at Kyung-Hee University Hospital. MBTI has become popular at 2020 among the young Koreans because face-to-face contact had decreased due to the coronavirus and it is easier to check personality types through smartphones and share them online. Furthermore Lee Dong-gwi, a psychology professor at Yonsei University states that young people in Korea have a great desire to understand and know ‘who I am’. Youtube videos also reflect this trend, a majority of the videos are MBTI-related or target specific MBTI results. There are debates, interviews about the test and there are even playlists for each MBTI. Entertainers in TV shows also talk about the MBTI test and there are even special episodes that deal with MBTI. 
 
 It would be great if this trend only had a positive effect, but there seem to be many problems due to the people who overly immerse themselves into the MBTI personality test. A rising number of Korean companies are asking job applicants to reveal their MBTI personality test results, displeasing job seekers who argue that the test is an illogical standard to screen and criticize their capabilities. The situation is far more serious in part-time job postings on sites like Job Korea. Some companies even have the MBTI test as an essential step before having an interview and moreover say that some MBTI results are not allowed to apply at all. For instance, some cafes in Korea posted on a part-time job posting site that they are only hiring people who have MBTI results that start with Es and will not hire people who have the MBTI results of INFP, INTP, INTJ. Companies must not have stereotypes or preferences over particular MBTIs and not use these results as a tool to judge personalities in the job hiring process. People should use these results only for entertainment and understanding each other than relying too much on these results and using them to filter job applicants.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 MBTI stands for Myers-Brigg Type Indicator and was developed by Isabel Myers and her mother Katherine Briggs based on their work with Carl Jung's theory of personality types. It presents a total of 16 personalities according to four indicators: extroversion and introversion (depending on how a person directs and receives energy), sensing and intuition (related to how a person takes in information), thinking and feeling (based on how a person comes to conclusions), judging and perceiving (indicating how a person relates to the outside world). It is relatively easy to use and is one of the most popular psychological instruments currently in use internationally.

 The MBTI personality test is one of the most popular tests in Korea right now, according to Paik Jong-woo, a professor of psychiatry at Kyung-Hee University Hospital. The MBTI has become became popular at in 2020 among the young Koreans because face-to-face contact had decreased due to the coronavirus and it is was easier to check personality types through using smartphones and to share them online. Furthermore Lee Dong-gwi, a psychology professor at Yonsei University states that young people in Korea have a great desire to understand and know ‘who I am’.  ‘who they are’. Youtube YouTube videos also reflect this trend, a majority of the videos are MBTI-related or target specific MBTI results. There are debates, interviews about the test and there are even playlists for each MBTI. Entertainers in on TV shows also talk about the MBTI test and there are even special episodes that deal with MBTI.

 It would be great if this trend only had a positive effects, but there seem to be many problems due to the some people who overly immerse immersing themselves into the MBTI personality test. A rising number of Korean companies are asking job applicants to reveal their MBTI personality test results, displeasing job seekers who argue that the test is an illogical standard to screen and criticize their capabilities. The situation is far more serious in part-time job postings on sites like Job Korea. Some companies even have the MBTI test as an essential step before having an interview and moreover say that potential applicants with some MBTI results are not allowed to apply at all. For instance, some cafes in Korea posted on a part-time job posting site that they are only hiring people who have MBTI results that start with Es and will not hire people who have the MBTI results of INFP, INTP, INTJ. It is important that employers are Companies must not have governed by stereotypes of or preferences over for particular MBTIs and that they do not use these results as a tool to judge personalities in the job hiring process. People should use these results only for entertainment and understanding each other than and not relying on them too much on these results and using them to filter job applicants. 
< Copyright © The Gachon Herald All rights reserved >
폰트키우기 폰트줄이기 프린트하기 메일보내기 신고하기
트위터 페이스북 미투데이 요즘 네이버 구글 msn 뒤로가기 위로가기
Comment (0)
Please enter the code for preventing auto-enrollment!   
Send
- Readers can write comments up to 200 words (Current 0 byte / Max 400byte)
Comment (0)
가장 많이 본 기사
1
The annals of the Joseon princesses.
2
Privilege of Youth, RAIL-RO
3
How much interest do you have in Korea, your country?
4
Let’s all enjoy Korean Thanksgiving
5
Way of communication that links people, simultaneous interpreter Lim Mira.
AboutContact UsAdvertisingFAQPrivacy PolicyE-mail address privacy
경기도 성남시 수정구 성남대로 1342 학생회관 315호
Copyright 2011 The Gachon Herald. All rights reserved. mail to webmaster@gachonherald.com